Radon: 5 Things to Know

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You found the perfect, gorgeous, energy efficient home well within your budget. You wonder to yourself, “why is this perfect home still on the market?” Then you read the disclosures. Your perfect pad has a serious radon problem.

Radon and You: What you should definitely know!

Radon is a reasonably common problem in homes, so if you come across a house that you absolutely adore, you’re not out of luck. Here are five things to know if you’re considering a home with a radon problem:

  1. Radon is a radioactive gas. You can’t smell it, see it or taste it, but it’s the second leading cause of lung cancer. Exposure over time will increase the likelihood of lung cancer in the home’s occupants if it’s left alone.
  2. Testing for radon is simple. You can choose to perform a short-term, long-term, or continuous test for radon levels in a building. The short-term tests are active charcoal-based and only take about a week to complete. These short-term tests are typically used by radon inspectors.
  3. Radon is everywhere. Radon occurs naturally in the environment as a result of the breakdown of radioactive elements, such as uranium. Because of that, it’s literally everywhere, but typically in very small amounts. It doesn’t become a problem until you’re exposed to high concentrations of the gas.
  4. You can mitigate radon in any home. With enough money and effort, any home can become a low radon zone. One in 15 homes has an unacceptably high radon level, which is why it’s so important to test yours. If you’re a homebuyer his is one of those things you can ask the seller to do prior to your occupancy.
  5. It’s possible that your house itself is causing your radon levels to be high. Certain building materials that happen to be almost everywhere in your home, like drywall and concrete, tend to radiate radon at very low levels. Once in a while, though, the radon coming out of the walls is more than just a little bit. In this case, you definitely need an expert to guide the mitigation.

Just because radon is everywhere doesn’t mean you have to live with it. Radon mitigation systems are very good at removing large amounts of radon from any home. Most work by literally sucking the radon right out of the crawlspace or from underneath a poured concrete slab like what you’d find in a basement.

If you need a radon vacuum, make sure yours comes with a continuous monitoring system as well. It might cost a little bit extra, but you’ll know exactly if or when radon levels are unacceptable. Since levels vary throughout the year, this is a good investment in your future.

 

 

 

Conrad Smith - Owner
Your Real Estate Consultant

REALTOR®, BOLD, EcoBroker, CNE, CHRE, ILHM, KW Luxury 

Professional Denver Real Estate for the Urban at Heart
www.UrbanProHomes.com